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Introduction
The role of port state control (PSC) has increased significantly in our industry. Although the subjectivity of port state inspections is controversial, Gard Services believes that PSC plays a vital part in ensuring the safety and quality of the industry. Therefore, we continuously monitor vessels detained within the Gard Marine and Gard P&I fleets. This is accomplished by reviewing the Paris Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), Tokyo MoU and the United States Coast Guard (USCG) detention reports posted monthly on their websites.

This article is a summary of the detentions of Gard P&I and Gard Marine vessels for the year 2000. A full report including detentions by classification society, flag state, and a detailed assessment of deficiencies is available to Gard Marine clients and Gard P&I members upon request.

Gard P&I port state detentions for 2000
In the 2000 P&I insurance year (February 2000 to January 2001), there were 127 port state detentions of ships entered with Gard P&I out of a total of 2,938 detentions by the Paris MoU, Tokyo MoU and USCG (see Table 1). This means that 4.26 per cent of all detentions were vessels entered with Gard P&I during the 2000 insurance year. The total number of deficiencies noted by the port state authorities for ships entered with Gard P&I was 1,255. The total number of detainable deficiencies was 406. This equates to an average of 3.2 detainable deficiencies per detention and an average number of 9.6 total deficiencies per vessel. The total number of days detained for all vessels was 386 days. This equates to an average of 2.9 detention days per vessel.

Table 1: Gard P&I port state detention
(March 2000 to February 2001)

Breakdown of detentions by ship type for vessels entered with Gard P&I
General cargo ships and bulk carriers/oil-bulk-oil (OBO) carriers account for the majority of detentions (see Table 2). Not surprisingly, the average age of the vessels detained for both types of ships is 23 years of age. For all other vessel types, although the average age of ships detained is relatively high (over 15 years of age except for gas carriers), the number of detentions is low.

Table 2: Gard P&I port state detentions by ship type and age

Breakdown of detention deficiencies
A further analysis was made based on the types of deficiencies for which vessels were detained (see Table 3). Manning and safety management (26 per cent), machinery and equipment (21 per cent) and lifesaving appliances (14 per cent) were the most common detention deficiencies. The single most frequent detainable deficiency was oily water separation and/or discharge with 50 deficiencies noted. Since oily water separation is a significant problem for shipowners and ship managers, Gard Services has issued two recent loss prevention circulars entitled, "Oily water separation and discharge: Risk of oil pollution versus vessel's safety" (Loss Prevention Circular 06-01) and "Oily water separation and discharge: Discharge of oil prohibited" (Loss Prevention Circular 07-01). Please refer to the Gard Services website at www.gard.no to obtain copies of these circulars.

Table 3: Detentions by deficiency for Gard P&I

Gard Marine port state detentions for 2000
For vessels entered with Gard Marine, from January 2000 to December 2000 there were a total of 147 port state detentions out of a total of 2,892 detentions by the Paris MoU, Tokyo MoU and USCG (see Table 4). This means that 5.08 per cent of all detentions were vessels entered with Gard Marine during 2000. In comparison, during 1999 vessels entered with Gard Marine accounted for 214 detentions accounting for 7.3 per cent of all vessels detained. Also in 2000, the total number of deficiencies noted by the port state authorities for ships entered with Gard Marine was 1,084, making an average number of 7.3 total deficiencies per ship. The total number of days detained for all vessels was 399 days equating to an average 2.7 detention days per vessel.

Table 4: Gard Marine port state detentions
(January 2000 to December 2000)

Breakdown of detentions by ship type for vessels entered with Gard Marine
The detention of bulk carriers is dominant for vessels entered with Gard Marine, accounting for 44 per cent of all detentions (see Table 5). The average age of the bulk carriers entered with Gard Marine is 16 years.

Table 5: Gard Marine port state detentions by ship type and age

Breakdown of detention deficiencies
The profile of detainable deficiencies for vessels entered with Gard Marine was similar to the profile of detainable deficiencies for Gard P&I vessels, except for environmental and fire safety matters (see Table 6). Detentions of vessels entered with Gard Marine had 18 per cent of the deficiencies related to fire prevention and 7 per cent related to environmental matters, whereas vessels entered with Gard P&I had 13 per cent related to fire prevention and 13 per cent related to environmental matters. Manning and safety management deficiencies (25 per cent), machinery and equipment (19 per cent) and fire safety (18 per cent) were the most noted detention deficiencies. The single most frequent detainable deficiency was lifeboat/survival craft related (36 deficiencies noted).

Table 6: Detentions by deficiency for Gard Marine

Summary
Gard Services will continue to monitor port state detentions as one of many indicators used to assess the quality of its fleets. Gard Services will also use trends in port state detentions to assess the types of experience transfer, such as loss prevention circulars, to enhance safety and reduce the frequency and consequences of port state detentions for vessels in its fleets.

 


Gard News is published quarterly by Gard Services AS, Arendal, Norway.